Designing materials for a circular economy

According to the European Union’s Circular Economy Action Plan, the industry can determine up to 80 % of a product’s subsequent environmental impact at the design phase. However, the linear manufacturing pattern offers few incentives to make products more sustainable. The research infrastructure project ReMade@ARI, which deals with innovative materials for key components in various areas such as electronics, packaging or textiles, aims to change this: The goal is to develop new materials with high recyclability and at the same time competitive functionalities. To this end, the institutions involved want to harness the potential of more than 50 analytical research infrastructures throughout Europe. MAX IV is a partner of this consortium.

Creating tastier vegan cheese using synchrotron X-rays

The quest for tastier, more sustainable vegan cheese has led Swedish food company Cassius AB to take a closer look at cheese protein structures. Using synchrotron X-rays at MAX IV, Cassius are searching for the perfect scientific recipe for plant-based cheese.

Webinar: Explore the ForMAX beamline at MAX IV

This fall, the ForMAX beamline at MAX IV will go into operation, opening the door to new research opportunities. You are invited to join a series of free webinars to learn about the beamline and how to get access to the instrument. The first webinar is on September 14th 2022.

Developing next generation biostimulants using synchrotron X-rays

Arevo, a company known for producing environmentally friendly solutions for improved plant establishment and growth, has performed its first experiment at MAX IV. The research is focused on developing a new line of biostimulant products with a unique nutrient release profile, ensuring beneficial long-term effects for both plants and soils.

Exploring the structure of industrial polymers with the help of the CoSAXS beamline

People consume goods daily without realising the journey those products have been through before being displayed on store shelves. Everything involved in the production is a result of thorough R&D, even the eye-catching package of the products has gone through a substantial evolution. To this day, researchers are working on taking the packaging to the

DanMAX is catalysing industry research

“Absolutely top-notch!” says Lars Lundegaard about the quality of data collected at DanMAX. Lars is a Research Scientist at Haldor Topsoe, one of the big companies providing solutions supporting decarbonization and the green energy transition. During the five-day experiment, Lars and his colleagues teamed up with scientists from the University of Oslo to study the chemical

Metal industry giant conducts experiments at MAX IV

Sandvik Coromant and Chalmers University of Technology teamed up to conduct experiments for increasing the product lifetime of metal cutting tools. With the help of the NanoMAX beamline at MAX IV, a team of scientists and R&D professionals will further study the atomic structure of the Titanium Aluminium Nitride (TiAlN) coatings. What makes metal cutting tools

X-Rays help the industry make chocolate even more enjoyable

Chocolate is the favorite sweet of millions around the world. What makes it even more tempting is the dozens of flavors that suit each consumer’s taste. To get something so favored to everyone in the form of new products, a team of Scientists from AAK and RISE have recently visited MAX IV to study the

Exeger investigates the chemistry of liquid-filled energy material

The Swedish solar cell technology company Exeger has recently been to the HIPPIE beamline at MAX IV along with researchers from KTH and Uppsala University. The goal of the visit was to study the electrochemistry of light conversion to energy in a dye-sensitized solar cell. The experimental setup at MAX IV offers a unique possibility to

Can additively manufactured steel be more corrosion resistant?

Modern-time manufacturing creates new challenges to tackle. So does additive manufacturing which is foreseen as the future of sustainable and cost-efficient production. Additive manufacturing (AM), known by many as 3D printing, has already been adopted by various industries around the world and many have already succeeded in using this technique. There are advantages to such a