Hanna Isaksson new member in the Young Academy of Sweden

Hanna Isaksson new member in the Young Academy of Sweden

Hanna Isaksson, Associate Professor in Biomedical Engineering at Lund University
and a user at MAX IV Laboratory has been elected new member in
the Young Academy of Sweden for the period 2018–2023

– I started familiarise myself with synchrotron research when I came to Lund in 2011. I study musculoskeletal tissue biomechanics, primarily bone, cartilage and tendons, and I am therefore interested in understanding how the tissue composition and structure affects its mechanical behaviour from the organ scale down to the molecular structure. My team use different tools including imaging, scattering and spectroscopy, and we strive to do in-situ mechanical experiments. The high signal to noise and the measurement speed at synchrotron facilities enable us to carry out more realistic in-situ experiments.
– We recently got the opportunity to explore the exciting new possibilities at NanoMAX using fluorescence and WAXS to study early mineralisation in embryonic bones. The high resolution enabled us to see how calcium depositions turn into mineral crystals during development.

Learn more about Hannas research here (Swedish) and here (English).


The Young Academy of Sweden is a transdisciplinary academy for a selection of the most prominent, younger researchers in Sweden. Its operations rest firmly on three pillars: transdisciplinarity, science policy and outreach. The Academy is an independent platform that provides younger researchers with a strong voice in the science policy debate and that promotes science and research to young adults and children. In the Academy young researchers meet across institutional and disciplinary borders to discuss research and research related topics. The Young Academy of Sweden was formed at the initiative of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and currently has 33 members. The Young Academy of Sweden’s operations is run by a Chief Executive Officer and a secretariat in the halls of The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RSAS), Stockholm, Sweden.