A photo of the MAXPEEM sample station

Strong coupling of thin ferromagnet to Manganese Gold compound yields successful antiferromagnetic read-out

Scientists demonstrated a strong coupling of very thin ferromagnetic Permalloy layers to the antiferromagnetic spintronics compound Manganese Gold. This enabled them to apply well-established read-out methods commonly applied to ferromagnets in antiferromagnetic spintronics as well. Up to this point, all commercially available spintronics uses ferromagnets as active elements. However, in principle, antiferromagnetic spintronics hold the

New event-averaging method to map catalyst structure and local gas environment simultaneously enables depiction of transitional active surface structures

One of the key challenges in catalysis research is to understand how catalysts’ structure and function relate to each other. Regardless of the type of catalyst in question, structure and function are dynamic with a strong dependence on the localized reaction conditions such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition just above the catalyst surface. Now,

Scientists detect key structures responsible for coupling process in sugar symporters and decode active sugar transport in plants

Researchers from Aarhus University achieved breakthrough insights about the coupling process that allows active sugar transport in plants aided by MAX IV’s BioMAX beamline. They successfully detected the inward and outward confirmations of the symporter Sugar Transport Protein 10 (STP10) – a protein responsible for monosaccharide transport across cell membranes – at high resolutions (1.8

Image: Empa

Zigzag graphene nanoribbons’ surface state hints at spin-polarized channels’ potential practical applications

An international team of researchers confirmed that epitaxial zigzag graphene nanoribbons grown on mesa-structured silicon carbide form protected spin-polarized transport channels at room temperature with very weak spin–orbit interaction. They discovered that while the zigzag graphene nanoribbon monolayer sank almost completely into a silicon carbide facet, its lower edge dissolved and mixed with the silicon